See how your MEPs have voted!

To see how your MEPs voted on the Minimum Income amendment in their report on A European Pillar of Social Rights (Rapporteur -Maria João Rodrigues MEP) see votes-mi-amendment-social-pillar-report: pages 46 and 47.  Please note there are still some days for corrections if voting is not recorded correctly. You may get the chance to speak with your MEPs to understand better why they voted they way they did and to continue to build the conversation with them about the importance of adequate and accessible Minimum Income Schemes.

European Parliament support for actions to ensure adequate minimum income schemes

The European Parliament accepted the following amendment in their report on A European Pillar of Social Rights (Rapporteur -Maria João Rodrigues MEP):  “Highlights the importance of adequate minimum income schemes for maintaining human dignity and combating poverty and social exclusion, as well as their role as a form of social investment enabling people to participate in society, and to undertake training and/or look for work; invites the Commission and the Member States to assess minimum income schemes in the European Union, including whether the schemes enable households to meet their needs; invites the Commission and the Member States to evaluate on this basis the manner and the means of providing an adequate minimum income in all Member States and to consider further steps in support of social convergence across the European Union, taking into account the economic and social circumstances of each Member State, as well as national practices and traditions;

The amendment was proposed by the Green, Social and Democrats and GUE groups and passed with the support of some members of the ALDE and EPP group.  This is a good basis of support for the work of the EMIN 2 project (2017-2018). A big thanks to EAPN mmebers and other civil society actors who engaged their MEPs to ensure support for this amendment.

New ESPN Report on Minimum Income Schemes in Europe

18/03/2016 – The European Social Policy Network (ESPN) has just published a major new report, Minimum Income Schemes in Europe: a Study of National Policies. The report finds that minimum income (MI) schemes play a vital role in alleviating the worst impacts of poverty and social exclusion in many countries. However, in too many countries MI schemes still fall short of ensuring a decent life for the most vulnerable in society. Progress in improving them in recent years has been disappointing. Continue reading

European Commission launches consultation package on a European Pillar of Social Rights

Créer un environnement favorable aux entrepreneurs: Réduire les coûts liés à la conduite des affaires et simplifier les formalités administratives08/03/2016 – the European Commission launched a public consultation on a European Pillar of Social Rights. EAPN welcomes an initiative that is rooted in a rights-based perspective. From the perspective of the EMIN Network, we welcome that the Communication from the Commission’s notes that Minimum income schemes do not exist in all Member States, as well as current challenges, such as inadequacy of benefit levels making it impossible for beneficiaries to escape poverty, low coverage, and non-take-up. It also points out difficulties with transitioning from unemployment benefits to minimum income. The commitment that “Adequate minimum income benefits shall be ensured for those who lack sufficient resources for a decent standard of living” will be important for the future work of EMIN. Continue reading

EESC should go back to basics and promote European integration, says its President Georges Dassis

Brussels, 13/11/2015 (Agence Europe) – The European Economic and Social Committee (EESC) should go back to its primary role, namely expressing the views of civil society and advising the other European institutions on the best ways of encouraging European integration, which could include drawing up a plinth of European social rights, as desired by the European Commission. “We have to have a concrete message.” And what could be more concrete than establishing a minimum European income financed by an EU fund or building a European platform of social rights? he asks. Continue reading